Looking After Your Mental Health When Studying

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*DISCLAIMER: WE ARE NOT MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALISTS, AND DO NOT CLAIM TO BE. THE DETAILS ON THIS BLOG POST IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. YOU SHOULD CONSULT WITH A QUALIFIED MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL FOR UP TO DATE ADVICE. WE ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY POST INCIDENTS.

No matter whether your course is part time or full time, we’re aware that studying can feel as though it’s engulfing your entire life. In some cases studying causes mental health issues, or on the other hand it may exasperate existing ones.

As cliché as it may sound, you should attempt to speak with someone about your mental well-being. It may take time but there are agencies out there who will want to help you.

This week we’re discussing mental health and we hope the guidance is applicable to you when you’re studying and face difficulties.

 


What is mental health?

 

Mental health is notably amongst the most complex of illnesses because it’s so multifaceted and is still considered as taboo. In more recent years there has been a more positive social shift around understanding mental health. At the same time there’s been a surge in social pressures and decrease in mental health care leaving society in chaos. Amongst all of this chaos possibly lies you, or someone you know who has been juggling their studies with their mental health.

It is not unheard of for people to battle with undiagnosed mental health related illnesses simply because they didn’t think what hey were going through constituted as a mental health matter. Below is a list of mental health related illnesses, and if you identify with any you should seek medical attention as soon as possible:

  • Anger
  • Anxiety and panic attacks
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)
  • Borderline personality disorder (BPD)
  • Depression
  • Dissociative disorders
  • Drugs – recreational drugs & alcohol
  • Eating problems
  • Hearing voices
  • Hoarding
  • Hypomania and mania
  • Loneliness
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Panic attacks
  • Paranoia
  • Personality disorders
  • Phobias
  • Postnatal depression & perinatal mental health
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)
  • Psychosis
  • Schizoaffective disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)
  • Self-esteem
  • Self-harm
  • Sleep problems
  • Stress
  • Suicidal feelings
  • Tardive dyskinesia

 

Where can you go if you believe you have mental health?

You’re probably as overwhelmed by that list as we were. If you do believe you’re suffering or have suffered with any of the illnesses from the list you should speak to a professional. You’re probably sick and tired of us telling you that, but it is true. There are many places that you can go to if you’re battling with mental health, these include:

  • Your GP
  • Anxiety UK
  • Bipolar UK
  • CALM
  • Men’s Health Forum
  • Mental Health Foundation
  • Mind
  • No Panic
  • OCD Action
  • OCD UK
  • PAPYRUS
  • Young suicide prevention society
  • Rethink Mental Illness
  • Samaritans
  • SANE
  • YoungMinds
  • NSPCC
  • Refuge
  • Alcoholics Anonymous
  • Narcotics Anonymous
  • Alzheimer’s Society
  • Cruse Bereavement Care
  • Rape Crisis
  • Victim Support
  • Beat
  • Mencap
  • Family Lives
  • Relate

 

How can you manage your mental health whilst studying?

 

Never forget that there’s no qualification in this world that should force you to compromise your mental health for good grades; always put your mental state first.

It is imperative that you obtain professional advice from a mental health practitioner about your mental health whether you’re studying or not. In addition to this, you can take advantage of the brief list of tips that we comprised, We hope they serve well during your studies especially during exam/assignment season. Although we can’t fully guarantee this list will entirely work on it’s own, we’re certain the advice will take some of the tension off:

  • Take regular breaks when studying
  • Identify your trigger factor and consider alternative things to do instead
  • TALK TO SOMEONE
  • Don’t be afraid to apply for extenuating circumstances
  • Consult your family
  • Make your tutor/lecturer aware
  • Try sticking to a study schedule
  • Meditate
  • Take frequent walks
  • Join a club/group/society
  • Take your medication as advised by your medical professional (if you have any)
  • Don’t do too many hours in the library
  • Visit your ‘happy place’ as often as you can (as long as it doesn’t jeopardise your health or safety)
  • Maintain a balanced diet

 

 

Useful Websites

 

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/types-of-mental-health-problems/

 

https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/policy-and-analysis/reports/Documents/2018/minding-our-future-starting-conversation-student-mental-health.pdf

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/tips-for-everyday-living/student-life/#.XO7vmy2ZM1I

 

https://www.rethink.org/resources/s/studying-and-mental-illness-factsheet

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/university-mental-health-students-depression-anxiety-suicide-alcohol-a8526051.html

 

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/publications/gp-visit-guide

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/

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