What to do now you have your A-Level results

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No matter how your A-level results went, we want to congratulate you for getting this far; you should be proud of yourself. This topic Thursday’s aims to offer you with some guidance (In no particular order) about what you can do now you have your official results.

  1. Drop an option (AS students)

If you’re an AS student, now might be the best time to sit down and think about which course you plan to drop for the next academic year. Some institutions may already have gone through this process with you during the exam period. If the opportunity still stands for you to drop an A-Level after receiving your results, take these three things into consideration (consult with teachers, parents and/or guardians):

“Will this course benefit my desired future goals?”

“Do I enjoy this course?”

“What will the course consist of next academic year?”

 

2. Be sensitive to others

It isn’t always the case that peers attain their expected results thus causing them to take routes for their future they hadn’t previously planned. The entire situation may be overwhelming and upsetting for them therefore, offer support to friends who may need it.

We’re sure that you’ll have time to celebrate your own achievements in your own time, but anyone feeling a bit disappointed on results day will appreciate your discretion.

 

3. Don’t worry

Collecting results will always be stressful. If you’re disappointed with your grades try to remember that things work out fine for the overwhelming majority of students and they will almost certainly work out fine for you too.

Do what advance preparation you can and you might find that you end up in a better situation than you thought. This is a time to look forward to the future and what adventures lie ahead, whatever they may be.

 

4. Refer to UCAS

If in doubt, speak to a superior at your institution.

UCAS hosts the Track facility allows you to check how your university applications are going. In order to access it, you’ll need your UCAS application number and a Track username and password.

If you are unsuccessful with your first choice offer, but meet the conditions for your second choice, you will be accepted there.

 

5. Consider Clearing

Clearing is a process you can go through if you applied for universities late, or if you didn’t receive the offers you wanted.

Have a look at the #TopicThursdays session from last week where we guided you on how to Go Through Clearing

 

6. Prepare for re-sits

You’ll know after receiving your results whether you’ll need to re-sit a subject or not – don’t panic if you do.

You should seek advice from your teachers, and speak to your parents. You could then contact the admissions tutors for the courses you are applying to for further clarity.

Have a look at the #TopicThursdays session where we assisted you on What to do if You Ever Have to Re-sit

 

7. Consider appealing

If you are unhappy with your results, you’re within your rights to take action where necessary. Either you, your school or college can appeal to the awarding body and if necessary, to the Independent Examinations Board.

Speak with your tutor and parents beforehand.

 

8. Gap Year

There are often times where people accept their place and defer it for a year to complete a gap year. Be sure to check out your plans with the admissions tutor of your chosen course.

Have a look at the #TopicThursdays session where we discussed in detail things to consider for Gap Years.

 

9. Apply for jobs

Whether it’s an alternative or supplement to an apprenticeship or attending University, applying for jobs may be something to consider following A-level results day.

Take a look at our very first #TopicThursdays from May where we referred to the Job Hunting process and offered plenty of advice  that will assist you.

 

10. Reward yourself! 🙂 

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